Infinitely Ordinary

Hola everyone.


And welcome back to another Friday and another end of the week. How are you guys? I hope you’ve had a good week, despite the current circumstances, and that you’re looking forward to the weekend. Also, guess what guys? I went outside today… without any reason. I know, what a shocker. And you know why? Because the quarantine here in Austria is officially over and I’m finally free to leave the house whenever I want. Weheeeeeee. I can’t believe it. It makes me so incredibly happy that we’ve already reached that point here, but also sad because the UK is still doing so bad and I have no idea when I’ll be able to fly back. I remember after I had left London, I told my mum that we should immediately fly to the first country that was doing well again, where life had gone back to normal. And now we already are in that country. Oh, the irony. But oh well, I’m glad I’m home, no matter what.

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Thankfully, music has kept me calm and collected throughout this madness and has brought me a lot of highlights and happiness. Just like today. Because today, after what felt like an eternity, The Wrecks finally released their debut album and I can’t even put into words how happy I am that it’s finally in this world.

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I’m not going to lie, I might be a bit biased when it comes to this band. Their song Favorite Liar was my most listened track of 2017 and even other years included it’s still high on top. So when I heard that they were about to release an album, I could only just about contain my excitement. And a debut album as well. I don’t know why, but I feel like debuts always have this unique touch of excitement and newness. There’s nothing like a first album, the first time a band really gets to show and present its talent in its full colours. And today is the day The Wrecks finally get to show us who they are. And I swear, they didn’t disappoint. Very much the opposite, to be honest. Because Infinitely Ordinary is even better than I had imagined.

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First of all, the probably most unique aspect of the album is that every song sounds different. I’m not gonna go into much detail, because I’m a strong believer that you can spoil an album just as much as you can spoil a movie and I definitely don’t want to spoil this fun rollercoaster of an album for anyone. So I’m going to keep the overall tracks and what they sound like a secret. All I’m gonna say is that they all sound phenomenal and that the debut couldn’t have been a better one. It’s an album that lights up the rainy day when you’re stuck inside with nowhere to go. It’s an album that makes you think of Californian beaches and the ease that comes with being young and free. And it’s album that reminds you that there’s always something to look forward to, even if it’s just a nice piece of music.

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I know that a lot of bands have decided to postpone their albums due to the current situation, which I totally understand. Still, I’m insanely happy that The Wrecks decided against that and went on to release their album as planned. Because the world might not be able to go to music stores now and get physical copies of songs and albums, but I think especially now we’ve got even more time on our hands to listen to some good music. And Infinitely Ordinary is no exception to that. It was definitely worth the wait and I already can see myself playing this over and over again. Naturally, this also means that I can’t recommend it enough to you guys. I swear you won’t regret giving it a listen. These boys really deserve all the attention they are receiving and I can’t wait to watch them grow bigger and bigger in the upcoming months. And hopefully come to Europe so I can finally see them live. I sure damn will be standing in the front row, waiting to hear this masterpiece of an album live. And until then it will stay as a staple of my quarantine playlist and hopefully of yours as well.

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And there you go, guys. This is today’s music recommendation from yours truly. I hope you enjoy the album just as much as me. And if you want to find out more about the guys, here are their Spotify and Instagram accounts. If you give them a listen, I’d love to hear your thoughts and opinions, so please don’t hesitate to get in touch. And until then I wish you all a lovely weekend and hope that you’re doing good. And, as always, I’m sending you the tightest hugs and thanks for reading. x

‘I passed my goal a long time ago’

Hola everyone.


And welcome back to my blog and a new week. I hope you’ve all had an amazing weekend and that you’re doing well.

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Today, I’ve got to share something very very special with you, guys. Something I haven’t really discussed with you in the past. I’m of course talking about the interview I did with the one and only Lewis Capaldi. And yes, I really mean THE Lewis Capaldi. The Scottish dude who’s currently at number 1 with his debut album and who recently sold out his tour in the UK within a few minutes. That guy, yes.

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Some of you might remember that I briefly mentioned going to his concerts in Brighton and London and meeting him in the past (here’s the link if you want to check that one out), but I’ve never really talked about the interview itself. Which, in all honesty, I don’t even want to do, because it doesn’t feel right in any way. The opposite of professional, actually. But now that some time has passed, I thought it would be nice to finally share the finished piece I wrote about the interview with you.

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But before you jump right into it, I want to add one thing: The interview I did with Lewis was my very first big one with a musician and even though it’s been about 8 months since I met him, I still can’t wrap my head around it. It still feels like a dream. Because, I mean, it’s Lewis freaking Capaldi. The guy I’m confidently calling the next Ed Sheeran. And I literally sat in a room with him, chatting for about 45 minutes, cracking jokes, the whole deal. Absolutely unbelievable. I’ll never ever forget how nicely he and his whole team treated me. It was my first step into an industry I’m hoping to become a full member of in the future and they all treated me like I had been part of the team for years. I can’t put my feeling of gratitude into words. I’ll never ever forget that interview. Never.

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So, and now that you know that, I’m proud to finally share my Q&A with Lewis with you. It was definitely one of the funniest, nicest and most interesting interviews I’ve ever done and if you haven’t become a fan of this guy until now, you really need to ceck out his new album ‘Divinely Uninspired to a Hellish Extent‘ and become one immediately. He really deserves all the attention he’s been receiving and so much more. He’s really a one-of-a-kind artist, especially once you get to see his Instagram and Twitter pages and experience his humour. And just so you’ve got an idea of what I mean – on his Wikipedia page it says that he plays ‘sunglasses’ for an instrument. Lewis, we all know you wrote that, just admit it. And, on another note, his twitter name is Lewis Crapaldi, because some hater called him that and he loved it so much, so he quickly turned it into his own joke. Yep, that’s Lewis. You just gotta love him.

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And now, without further ado, please enjoy the article down below. And, as always, please don’t hesitate to leave your thoughts and comments down below. I’d love to know what you think. Until then I wish you all a fantastic week and, of course, thanks for reading. x


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‘I passed my goal a long time ago’

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At the young age of twenty-two, Lewis Capaldi’s career couldn’t be more fairy-tale-like. Within less than two years the Scottish singer-songwriter went from singing in karaoke bars and self-releasing his heart-wrenching debut track ‘Bruises’ to supporting the likes of Sam Smith and Rag’n’Bone Man and selling out one tour after another.

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I caught up with Lewis before his sold-out show at London’s Shepherds Bush Empire to talk about his most recent experiences with success, staying true to himself in the age of social media and handling all the attention he’s been receiving.

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A few years ago, did you think you would end up where you are now?

No. I mean, I was kind of always doing this, but I didn’t think I would be doing it to this level. I did think I would be playing music, but my goal was to play 350 capacity rooms around the UK and, if I was lucky, 100 capacity rooms in Europe. And not even to necessarily play my own songs. I just wanted to play music and be able to make money off it. And so far it’s been very nice, but to be playing shows this size is a very weird thing. To have someone come to my room to ask me questions and write down what I’m saying so people can read it is a very weird thing. And having people outside in the queue know who I am is very weird. And it can all go away very fast. I’m not saying I would be okay with it, but if it did go away, I would still be playing music. I passed my goal a long time ago.

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That must feel pretty amazing, right?

I’m pleased with it. But I’m sure we’ve all done amazing things, but have been too close to them to realize how amazing they are. That’s when you need to take a step back and go ‘oh, that is kind of amazing’. Sometimes I’m really bugged down about things going wrong. I think, as people, we are kind of drawn to focus on the things that go wrong rather than the things that go right.

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Why did you start your career by releasing your music yourself?

Nobody wanted to sign me. *laughs* I’m joking. I just think the first thing you release should come from you. If you want your first piece to be exactly how you want it to be and how you see it, you should release it yourself.

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Sounds like music means a lot to you…

I approach it as I approach everything else – I don’t take it too seriously. If I’m having a shit time and I write a song about it, I’m able to work through it, but it’s not like therapy. I don’t agree with people who say it is. But being able to look at things from that angle and seeing they aren’t necessarily as bad as they seem is good. Sometimes a good song comes from a bad thing. But I don’t want to put too much weight on things, even with music. It feels more like an old, familiar friend.

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Which part of being a musician do you enjoy the most and is there something you hate?

I love playing live, that’s the main thing. That’s where I came from, that’s why I’ve done most of it. I’ve played live more than anything else. But I fucking hate being in the studio. It’s the most boring fucking thing ever. And I don’t know if that comes across in my music, but it’s just so tedious. Not so much being there with a producer and coming up with ideas, that’s fun. But the actual recording of the vocal is the fucking most boring fucking thing you’ll ever do in your life. For me, I record music so I can go and play it live.

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And what about interacting with your fans?

Again, this is a very weird job. So having lots of human interaction online and during the shows is very important to me. And I mean, how often are you sat in your room, just randomly scrolling through Facebook and Twitter, bored out of your fucking mind? And I can just go and talk to people. It makes me feel more normal about everything. Suddenly it isn’t just a big, faceless crowd. And also, it can probably make someone’s day, so if I can make someone feel good, that’s just fucking sick.

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Speaking of the internet – how do you stay true to yourself in the age of social media?

So many singers nowadays are very careful about what they do online. And I think, if you’re not a horrible person, you don’t really have to be careful. I was like this at the beginning, but I don’t want to not be myself because of that. I think it’s a hard thing to do for a lot of singers. But, again, this is a very weird job. The fact that so many people follow me on Instagram is a fucking weird thing. But you know what, it’s not that weird if you just ignore the fact that it’s weird. When I was growing up, I would have liked people to just be themselves as much as they can. That’s why, in the past, I always used to say: ‘if you don’t like a chubby guy singing sad songs you’ve come to the wrong fucking place’.

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Also published in: The Sun & Brighton Life Magazine

‘The definition of ambition’

Hola everyone.


How are we doing today? I hope so far you’ve all had a great week and that your Friday is going great. Today, guys, I have the honour to share something very very very special with you. Some of you might remember that this February, I finally got see one of my favourite bands live – the one and only Hippo Campus (here’s my post about the show – click me). But that wasn’t the most exciting part, oh no. Easily the best part was that, before the show, I also got to interview them. And yes, I know. How crazy is that? I honestly still can’t believe that this really happened. When I think back to it, it feels like I had some kind of weird fever dream and that it was never real. But it was. I really met and talked to them. And they really were the nicest, coolest and most chill people I’ve ever met. I can’t even begin to describe how eternally grateful I am that I really got to do this. What a dream come true.

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And, so, now that you know this, you also know what this post is all about. Exactly, the interview. But before you get all excited, no, I don’t mean I’m going to spill the beans of the whole experience. Oh no. Even better. Today, I finally get to share the finished piece I wrote about the interview with you. And trust me, I waited quite a while to be able to say this. But I’m so so so glad the day is finally here. So, without further ado, here’s my feature about one of the best bands ever – Hippo Campus.


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THE DEFINITION OF AMBITION

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There comes a point in every band’s existence when the youthful enthusiasm of the early days has to give way to a more sophisticated version of themselves. Formed in 2013, the Minnesota band Hippo Campus was born from a group of high-school friends who were just looking to have a good time. But after releasing their first album, years of touring and gaining popularity, especially in the ranks of indie fans, they suddenly found themselves in a less inspirational atmosphere. They needed a change.

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This special desire to shake things up has always been present in the five piece’s music, and their second album ‘Bambi’ is a liberal, maybe darker, more experimental realisation of exactly that. While their debut release ‘Landmark’ was full of bubbly excitement and youthful lightness, they felt driven to change direction and go that little bit deeper. They wanted an honest reflection of themselves. “I think it was mostly reflective of the times. We were all in this weird kind of state. The stress of creating a second album, there’s a lot of pressure on that. And we didn’t want to have that pressure. It’s darker just because of where we were at that time,”, says Whistler Allen, drummer of the indie group.

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“Part of that was that we felt chewed up a little bit. You get out of high school and after the first couple of years of touring and after the first album, you experience something that isn’t what you thought it was,” adds Nathan Stocker, lead guitarist of the band and co-writer of most of the Hippo tracks. “People suck sometimes and there’s hurt. The process of maintaining the relationships that actually matter to you and to what you’re doing as a musician, artist or whatever you want to call it, gets really tiring.”

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Thus, calling this new era of Hippo Campus “real” would be a strong understatement. As they turned the page to pave the way for ‘Bambi’, the band found freedom in being an open book lyrically, but also personally. “It’s a very vulnerable place to be a songwriter, because it’s like ‘okay, I’m going go outside and use a megaphone to let everybody know what I think and what is going on in my life and feel free to look over my shoulder and hate me or love me’. You’ve got open arms to the world and the audience you have and that’s so scary. Because they can chew you up and spit you out,” Stocker explains and pinpoints the one aspect, the sheer honesty, that gave their newest release a certain feel of relatability. “Really, there’s no reward in it other than making it for the sake of being in that place at all. There’s really no other tangible reward. Even if it resonates with people, it still sucked for me to write.”

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It seems that the American band never shies away from acknowledging the fears and emotions of the current generation, actively addressing issues like the #MeToo movement, mental health or toxic masculinity, and using their album to process and accept them at the same time. Whether it be overwhelming worry (‘Anxious’), inescapable self-doubt (‘Mistakes’) or failing relationships (‘Why Even Try’), ‘Bambi’ covers nearly every area when it comes to the highly personal issues the band members had to face. The album fluctuates between blissful calm to vigorous chaos, while the lyrical discomfort fits in with the awkward, socially uncertain times that they were dealing with.

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And although it’s a reckless existence, the Minnesota five-piece wouldn’t have it any other way – gig by thrilling gig – their path so far has surpassed even their greatest expectations.  Now, it’s even the small issues and tiny stones that stop them in their ways they get excited about. “That’s part of why we love it so much, actually. If you don’t get irritated by little things, then you won’t know that you’re having a ton of fun with your friends every day,” exclaims DeCarlo Jackson, trumpet player and newest addition to the band. Stocker adds, “I’m excited to be irritated by stuff that actually matters. That’s the definition of ambition. It’s tackling problems that actually further us.”

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This is where their newest LP comes into play, as where ‘Landmark’ only touched the surface, ‘Bambi’ dives in head first. It’s the new side of music and writing that the band hopes can shine a light on the gap between reality and society’s expectations of constant perfection. Especially at current times, social media and the pressure that comes with it push down on a lot of bands. A pressure Hippo Campus isn’t willing to accept. “Naturally, if you’re not being the most honest version of yourself, there’s nothing else you could be except somebody else. Because if you’re not being you, then you’re definitely trying to marble yourself after someone else. But you know, sometimes we dress up,” Allen insists.

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It’s this way of wearing their hearts on their sleeves and being their truest forms that seems to capture their fans. Together, they share this powerful connection that has been there from the start and only gotten stronger through their newest release. “The fans are everything,” Stocker agrees. “They just continue to be unbelievable people, who, for whatever reason, love our music. It’s always really bizarre to interact with them. Because it’s like ‘what have I done to deserves this?’. It’s just really good to feel the love and support and to see they’re real people who are experiencing real things and sharing a space with us. I know it could be a lot more segregated in terms of feeling like we have some superior upper hand to them, but it is pretty communal, on and off stage.”

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From the start, always returning to this certain kind of passion and unapologetic honesty, Hippo Campus have looked to create a release that is both enchantingly light and devastatingly dark when it needs to be. While it focuses strongly on issues that clearly mean a lot to the band, the general tone of their newest record is one of optimism, looking for the brief moments of joy in a world with little to spare. And at the end, it’s the sheer love for music that brings them all together and provides the album with its special glow. Stocker concludes: “Music is the most interesting and spiritual example of memory that humans can have, to me. There’s nothing else really that is as fascinatingly metaphysical than the feeling when you listen to a really good song for the first time. For me as a person, there’s no other thing that exists other than memory. In the end, that’s all we have. Our entire progress is based on it, it’s the foundation of life. The fact that we can remember, the fact that I can play my instrument, is entirely based on memory. And music is the prime exemplification and personification of memory. And fin.”

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So, there you go, guys. I dearly hope that you enjoyed reading this piece. Also, please do go and check out this band, they really deserve all the attention they are receiving right now and so much more. Here are all their social media handles: Spotify, YouTube and their official website.

As always, please don’t hesitate to leave your comments and thoughts down below and do please get in contact if you’ve got any questions. And until then, I wish you all an amazing weekend and, of course, thanks for reading. x

Interview with Saint Raymond

Hola everyone.


And welcome back to my blog. I’m sorry for being gone for so long, but I hope you’ve all had a great time and that you’re doing well. I know at the end of my last post I said that I’d be coming back with a huge post about Avengers: Endgame, but, honestly, it’s been over a week since I saw it and I still haven’t been able to fully process it. My plan now is to watch Infinity War and then see Endgame again straight the day after, so I can really say which one I prefer. And then I want to put all my thoughts, emotions and opinions into one long, deserving post for you all to read. Unfortunately, that means it will be packed with spoilers, so I’ll just say it now – if you haven’t seen the movie, don’t read anything about it, don’t ruin it for yourself and just watch it. Also, props to you if you’ve made it this far without coming across spoilers. Well done.

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So, now that we’ve talked about that, let’s get to the real deal, which is something I’ve been burning to tell you ever since it happened. Some of you might remember the concert review I did of the Saint Raymond show I went to in March (here’s the link if you want to check it out). I absolutely loved the show, but I didn’t tell you everything that happened on that day. So, here comes the crazy part: I didn’t just go to the concert, I actually met up with Callum (Saint Raymond) before his show in Brighton to do a little interview with him. I know, I know. Holy moly. I still haven’t been able to wrap my head around it either. And oh wow, it was such a lovely interview. I felt so welcome and it was just so chill and nice. And Callum was absolutely fantastic as well. Definitely one of those hours of my life that I’ll never ever forget. And I’m so happy that I finally get to share the piece I wrote about it for my university magazine with you. I really hope you enjoy it. Also, please don’t forget to show Callum some love (here’s the link to his Spotify and his website), he really deserves it. And, as always, please don’t hesitate to leave your thoughts down below and thanks for reading. x

 


‘It’s a show-off world’

Nottingham born and bred Callum Burrows, aka singer-songwriter Saint Raymond, exploded on to the music scene in 2013 with his EP release ‘Escapade’. Following that the young artist not only went on to open for some of the biggest names in music, but also toured festivals including Glastonbury, right before releasing his No. 1 debut album. After a short hiatus, the singer is now ready to go bigger than ever. I met up with Callum at Patterns in Brighton before his show to chat about standing your ground in the music industry, crime-podcasts and supporting music-star Ed Sheeran.

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Did you ever expect to end up where you are now?

No, not at all. Obviously I hoped I would, but I never thought I’d be doing music as a career. I never expected it to get to a point where I get to do it for a living. Which is still weird for me to say, because I think I sometimes take it for granted. Like with anything, you have your highs and lows and I often forget that music is my job. Which is pretty cool. Ten years on, still get to play shows. It’s crazy.

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What is the one memory you will never forget?

There was this special moment when I played a hometown show in Nottingham, at Rock City. I actually played it three times, but that first gig was an unreal experience, because I had grown up going to gigs there. And suddenly people were queuing to see me and I just thought ‘what the hell is going on?’. So, that will always live long in my memory. And besides that, the tour with Ed was super crazy as well.

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Speaking of that – how did you get to support him?

I met him through a mutual friend and then ended up going to his birthday party, where we had a chat. And then, about a month later, he just texted me out of the blue saying ‘hey man, do you want to go on tour?’. I couldn’t believe it. I actually kept it a secret from my band until the official announcement. I just told them that we would be going on tour in October. That really was an amazing experience, which I’ll be forever grateful for.

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Looking back on all your songs – what’s your favourite one?

That would probably be ‘As We Are Now’, because it meant so much to me at the time. I wrote it when I was kind of hoping to do music for a career, but I wasn’t sure that I was going to. All of my friends had gone to university, so they knew what they were going to do for their jobs after. But I was just in this period where I wasn’t a kid anymore and had to take some responsibility. So that one will always be a special one.

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Is that why you released two versions of it?

Yes, that was a mad decision, to make the fast version. I don’t want to bitch too much, but I prefer the slow one. You know, there are a lot of things that happen with music, especially when you’ve got a big team around you, where decisions just get made that aren’t always the right ones. Or not solely what you want. But it’s hard when a lot of people are throwing in their opinions, because, at first, you know what you want, but then you get a bit lost in it. So that’s what I’ve learned over the last few years, to stand my ground a bit more and go for what I believe in. I was very young when I made that first record, it was a big learning curve.

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What’s another part that you had to get used to?

Definitely social media. I think Twitter is such an important tool as an artist, but I struggle to use it to its full capacity. It’s easier now when I’m on tour because I can talk about that, but it’s really hard to interact when you’re not doing those things. At least for me. I know some other people who are amazing at it, like Lewis Capaldi. He’s got it nailed down. But then again, right now, there are a lot of people in the industry trying to copy that. And that’s when you look like an idiot. Because you’re trying to be someone you’re not. Which is mad. Especially now with the whole Instagram world, I think it’s so important to be who you are on social media. It drives me crazy how people are living a life that isn’t real. It’s a show-off world.

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How about using Twitter and Co. to connect with your fans?

Oh yeah, I think it’s so important to interact with them. Before social media, bands were untouchable. You couldn’t access them unless you went to a show or met them somewhere, whereas now you can genuinely have a chat with anyone. You can literally send a message to the president of America, not that you would want to. But that’s how the internet works now. And I think sometimes people forget that if it wasn’t for the fans, they wouldn’t be doing what they’re doing. Because who would buy the tickets, the t-shirts, the albums? They start to think they are on a platform above them. Which isn’t true. That’s why, after every show and not just on social media, I’ll always try to come out and talk to people. I mean, them coming to the show means that I get to do in in the first place, so why shouldn’t I?

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And would you call yourself a fan of someone as well?

Of course. Loads of people. But my biggest inspiration right now has to be Ariana Grande. I once saw her perform live at this charity event in Central Park in New York. She came on stage with Coldplay and, until today, it’s the best live vocal I’ve ever heard. The whole day overall was just absolutely crazy. I stepped on Jay-Z’s foot by accident and then met Leonardo DiCaprio. Weirdest day of my life. And besides that, I’m a huge fan of murder podcasts. They’re my jam.

 

The Lemon Tunes

Hola everyone.


And welcome back to another Friday. A musical Friday again, but in a quite different way. Since starting this blog and really getting into music, I wanted to set up a playlist, solely for this blog, to kind of go with it. I know I always add in YouTube links to my posts about music, when I share my new favorite tracks and stuff, but a real playlist on Spotify just is something completely different. Bottom line: it was well overdue, but, finally, here it is. The official ‘thatlemonlife’-playlist.

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As you can probably tell, I had the most fun creating this. Plainly because it meant I could go through all of my saved songs and different playlists on Spotify and pretty much choose my absolute favorites. And you know how much I love sharing my music. So this is an actual dream come true for me, which again brings up the question why I only just now created this… Oh well, better late than never, right?

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As usual, I hope you enjoy these songs just as much as I do. Honestly, I’d love to hear your opinions and thoughts. And even if you don’t like some, I’d love to hear from you nonetheless. Some of you might know some of the songs from our usual “New Music Friday” section or from one of my countless posts about my current favorite songs and albums. Some songs basically represent my childhood and my teen years, some songs are very recent and some might be super popular and some might be completely new to you. What they all have in common though is that I love them with all of my heart. And if I’m gonna be honest, this playlist is literally me as a playlist. The playlist is me and everything I love when it comes to music. And this might sound creepy now, but when you’re listening to it, you’re basically listening to my soul. And isn’t that the most beautiful thing ever?

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So yeah, there’s that. Honestly, I’d be super happy and thankful if you gave the playlist a listen and maybe even told me your verdict. I’ll try to update it regularly and add new songs to it whenever I can, so it’ll definitely be worth a visit here and there. And yeah, until then I hope you enjoy the songs and this post and wish you all an amazing weekend. And, as always, thanks for reading. x

What’s Up

Hola everyone.


I can’t believe the weekend is already over and a new week has started again. Can you believe that? Feels like time is just flying past, right? Which I guess is kind of a bad and a good thing, as it means that I’ll be home for the christmas break in the blink of an eye. But it also means that my time here is passing by real fast and I can tell you, it’s such an amazing time that I don’t even want that to happen.

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Which is also what I want to tell you all about today. Actually, I was just working my way through possible ideas for my this post right here and kind of remembered that it’s been quite some time since I just talked a bit to you guys and told you about all the stuff that’s happening in my life here in Brighton. Which I why I decided that it’s time to change that. So, get ready and buckle up for some babbling.

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As always, let’s start with the most exciting part – my life here in Brighton. It won’t surprise you that, honestly, uni has just been amazing so far. Guys, I just love it so so so much. Maybe it’s because I already have a degree in journalism, as it means that I get to actually chill and listen in class, as I’ve already heard about most of the stuff we’re talking about. But it’s just so nice to simply sit there and soak it all up. All the music related stuff I’ve never heard about. It feels like I’m refining my own knowledge and also possible career path right now. And it’s so cool that my course is as practical as it is, because I get to actually do and write stuff and not just sit around and write down facts I’ll probably never need again in my entire life. Which, speaking of that practical, is also a quite big deal for me right now, as I may or may not have an interview scheduled for this week. Saying that I’m overly nervous and excited at the same time would be such an understatement. I’ve basically been at the edge of my seat the past few days.

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Also, music-wise, I can’t wait for 2019 to come flashing around the corner. Honestly. I’ve already got so many concerts planned. Hippo Campus in February, Saint Raymond, Tom Rosenthal (which I still can’t get my head around) and  Twenty One Pilots in March, Ed in June and again in August. I may have actually forgotten a few right there. It’s just so so crazy. And I can’t wait, seriously. Just one of those perks when you live in the UK – every single band comes here. Every. Single. One. This is like heaven, no joke. My personal heaven.

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And last but not least, there’s one other thing that’s quite new in my life. Believe it or not, but I actually started doing yoga. Can you believe it? Me? Doing yoga? Sounds like something out of this world, doesn’t it? But I guess I just felt like I had to incorporate a bit more exercise into my daily routine, as the typical English weather has just full on hit us now and it’s basically either windy or rainy or plain both. At home I usually stick to the indoor-cycle as soon as it’s getting cold out, but as I don’t have one here in Brighton I had to find something else. Something cheap and easy, preferably. So I just thought about trying yoga and so far I’ve really enjoyed it. I love how it really calms my mind down and makes me focus on myself and my body. Which is just what I need right now. I’ve actually just started this 30 day yoga challenge on YouTube, which is amazing, so if you want to check that out too, here’s the link.

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And yeah, I think that’s it. So far, my time here in Brighton has been the best it could’ve possibly been and I’m so excited for everything that’s still to come. If you guys want to know anything or have any questions, please don’t hesitate to drop me a message. And that’s all I’ve got. But how about you guys? What’s going on in your life? Please don’t hesitate to share your stories. And yeah, I hope you’re all feeling well and wish you a nice week. And, as always, thanks for reading. x